10 MOST COMMON WORDPRESS ERRORS AND THEIR SOLUTIONS

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wordPress is stable software and operates without issues most of the time. However, at times, things may go a little haywire, and your WP website can refuse to function normally.

While WordPress is really easy to use, there are some common WordPress errors that can make you panic. The good thing is that the WordPress error you are seeing on your site is most likely been reported and resolved by someone before you. At WPBeginner, we have written tutorials on how to fix several popular WordPress errors. In this article, we will cover the 40 most common WordPress errors along with showing you how to fix all of these common WordPress errors.

1. 504 Gateway Timeout

504 Gateway Timeout is a server-side error occurs when your site server is unable to receive the next server response. It makes your site slower and can cause some serious damages to the performance of your website. If not addressed properly can also result in a loss of SEO ranking due to slow loading time.

In order to get rid of this error, you can talk to your hosting provider support team. You can try opening your website on multiple devices to know whether the problem occurs on all devices or just one kind of device.

2. White Screen of Death

As the name suggests, a White Screen of Death means when you access your website, you see nothing but a blank page.

There can be multiple reasons behind a WSOD, the most common ones being compatibility issues with a plugin or a theme. Of course, the “incompatibility” itself can have multiple faces: a plugin may have a conflict with another plugin, or a plugin may not be compatible with the latest version of WP. Similarly, a theme may also experience compatibility issues with WordPress after an update.

The easiest solution is to first isolate your plugins’ directory. To do so, navigate to the root of your WP installation via FTP (assuming you cannot, at all, access your website and all you get is a WSOD), and then head to /wp-content. Locate the folder named “plugins” and rename it (let us say, “plugins_old”). Create a new folder named “plugins”.

This will isolate all your plugins, and if your website works fine, then yes, one of your plugins is at fault. Do not open your plugins page at this point, else you may end up deactivating all your plugins.

Once you have verified that one of the plugins is behind the WSOD, you can copy individual plugin files from “plugins_old” to plugins”, one by one, to check which one is causing the WSOD.

3. How to Fix the Error Establishing a Database Connection

This error message is clear that your website is unable to connect to the database. However solving this error can be tricky for beginners.

Usually this occurs when a user has entered or modified their database credentials (database host, database username, and database password) incorrectly. Sometimes your database server could be unresponsive, or your database may have corrupted.

However, mostly it is incorrect database login credentials. Take a look at common solutions for this problem.

10 MOST COMMON WORDPRESS ERRORS AND THEIR SOLUTIONS
10 MOST COMMON WORDPRESS ERRORS AND THEIR SOLUTIONS

4. White Screen of Death

White Screen of Death is another most common error which occurs many times with the webmasters. This error is more frustrating than the others because you don’t even have any idea about the cause of the error. It can downgrade your site performance if not properly diagnosed.

You can try enabling debugging, default theme and increasing memory limit to get rid of the error. Doing this will allow you to know the exact cause and then you can solve it easily.

5. Connection Timed Out

An error that you receive from an overloaded server (or a badly configured server).

It generally happens when the website’s server is too overloaded and is unable to complete your browser’s request. Nothing puts it more eloquently than the WordPress Codex

6. How to Fix the Sidebar Below Content Error in WordPress

Another common issue beginners face is when the sidebar appears below the content when it is supposed to appear next to the content. This issue is mostly caused by WordPress themes.

Sometimes when users are adding code snippets to their site, they may accidentally forget to close an html div tag or add an extra closing div which may result into breaking the theme layout. Another common cause is using disproportionate width in CSS or not clearing float properly.

7. How to Fix White Text and Missing Buttons in WordPress Visual Editor

Sometimes buttons from WordPress visual editor may disappear or start showing blank white spaces instead of buttons.

This problem may occur when concatenated JavaScript is not working. It may also caused by missing or corrupt TinyMCE files, or conflict with some other plugin that modifies or extends the TinyMCE shipped with WordPress.

8. Cannot Log in to the Admin Area

Another most common error occurs when you have forgotten your login credentials which makes you unable to log in to the admin area. This makes it important to resolve unless you won’t be able to post new content on your website.

In order to resolve it, you can tap on the Lost your Password button to recover your password. If you’ve forgotten your email address too, then you can view your login credentials in the PHPMyAdmin file.

9. Error 28

Error 28 is more of a MySQL error and is not related to WordPress. Even Drupal, Joomla! or other CMS’ websites can experience it.

Error 28 can occur if the cache on your web server is full or if you have too many files in your /tmp

If you can, then try to empty your /tmp directory. Alternatively, you should contact your web host to help you resolve the cache related issues.

 10. Warning File Get Contents

If you do not have access to your php.ini file, you will need to contact your web hosting provider and ask them to enable allow_url_fopen. Also, if this error is followed by a message such as “failed to open stream: no such file or directory in…”, it can mean that the mentioned file is either missing or not readable (look for it in the specified path, and if you find it, check its file permissions).

There you have it — solutions to the most common WordPress errors! Got an error message or a solution of your own that I missed? Share it in the comments below!